February 5th , 2013 10:27 am Leave a comment

Engineers to take crack at solving watery woes

By

Few people enjoyed last month’s heavy flooding, except maybe those who make or sell galoshes.

Photo by Brandon HicksFloodwaters from Laurel Fork Creek made their way down to Swimming Pool Road in Hampton. County officials are currently consulting with state agencies to determine the best way for residents to address recurring floods.

Photo by Brandon Hicks
Floodwaters from Laurel Fork Creek made their way down to Swimming Pool Road in Hampton. County officials are currently consulting with state agencies to determine the best way for residents to address recurring floods.

And the county has plans to make those folks unneeded.

In light of the heavy precipitation that plagued Carter County in January, county officials have arranged for environmental engineers to look for possible solutions to public safety issues.

County Mayor Leon Humphrey said he expected these engineers to arrive Monday, though he could not provide a timetable as to how long their work may take.

“I have no idea at this time,” Humphrey said. “But we’re trying to expedite matters as quickly as possible.”

January saw no shortage of environmental calamity in Carter County.

Heavy rains and snow caused Laurel Fork Creek to overflow on three separate occasions, forcing residents from their homes; during the Jan. 15 rainstorm, the banks along Stoney Creek eroded enough to jeopardize the structure of Coney Island Road; and, in the same period, mudslides blocked Roosevelt and Taylor avenues in Biltmore.

Comments

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

share Facebook Twitter

Switch to our mobile site