October 18th , 2011 10:27 am Leave a comment

Social before the light of day

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This is a photo of a new baby on the way. It’s the new baby on the way for Jennifer and Scott Kilgore photographed by Ultrasound in September of 2011.

It’s not uncommon today for expecting parents to update their social media website with sonograms like this to announce the exciting news. Sure, it’s hard to distinguish much from these images and although the technology is fascinating, there’s another interesting attribute of this shared image that’s worth noting.

According to recent surveys almost 81% of the world’s population has a social media profile on the Internet before the age of two. While the rest of us are still pondering the privacy and narccistic attributes of “social media,” there’s a new generation who find themselves imprinted in the memory of the web before they ever see the light of day.

With over 800 million people on Facebook and millions of others who use other social media tools, it’s worth noting that we’re having to manage more than our personal interactions face to face. In fact, one might argue that we wrestle with our virtual personalities as well. To some degree, we’re our own brand managers broadcasting our lives in updates, photos, videos and digital remnants of our personal and professional lives – for eternity.

I won’t suggest that we’re telling the whole truth. After all, editing the online images and monitoring our content has become an obsession for some.

Nevertheless, future generations won’t wrestle with the pros and cons of this new digital frontier. It will soon be just the way things are and although many of us are building the Network now in our lifetime, I’m sure that the next generations will improve this experience even greater.

There’s an amazing human story playing out before our eyes as we’re all publishers and contributors in this digital space. We’re the authors and directors of our own story. In one respect, it’s easy to see that we’re creating an entertaining and academic treasure trove of life in the 21st Century.

The children of tomorrow will not only see the images of their earliest days of creation and every special event forward. Collectively, they’ll have an amazing network of comments, relationships and personalities to explore their own understanding of their past and perhaps a unprecedented interpretation of who they are and how they made it into this amazing world in which we live.

God speed Baby Kilgore!

 

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