December 13th , 2013 10:08 am Leave a comment

Top job: Courthouse Annex roof project under way

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Carter County Sheriff Chris Mathes made his first trip to the top of the Carter County Courthouse Annex on Thursday to assess how far along the roofing project has come since it was initiated right after Thanksgiving.

Photo by Brandon Hicks Morristown Roofing employees use a blowtorch to heat up the rocks cemented to the Carter County Courthouse Annex in order for them to be more easily removed.

Photo by Brandon Hicks
Morristown Roofing employees use a blowtorch to heat up the rocks cemented to the Carter County Courthouse Annex in order for them to be more easily removed.

“It’s getting a whole new roof on it,” Mathes said.

Mathes said he was happy to see construction workers, who represent the company that won the roofing bid, making progress on the project.

Construction workers from Morristown Roofing of Whitesburg, Tenn., could been seen shoveling rock into bins that were being lowered by a crane.

“The roof has this gravel all across the top of it, so they are having to scrape every bit of it off,” Mathes said. “Once they get the gravel up, they have to literally cut into the roof.”

The rocks that were adhered to the top of the roof add a lot of excess weight to the top of the structure, Mathes said.

The rocks and other fencing materials are going to be recycled, said Ron Boudreau, who was the Morristown Roofing project supervisor on Thursday.

In the early 1980s when the building was built to serve as a jail, Mathes said the fencing materials were placed on the roof to create an area for inmates to exercise.

“This is where we used to have to take inmates for recreation time,” Mathes said. “The fencing was such an eyesore and it won’t go back up.”

Boudreau said once the rocks and excess materials are removed from the site, they will begin to remove the rubber membrane currently installed on the roof.

“There’s lightweight concrete under that and we are going to take that up all the way down to the deck,” Boudreau said. “The rocks hold this roof down, but we are going to glue the roof down now.”

The deterioration of the roof has spurred many leaks, which has damaged the integrity of the building’s interior, Mathes said.

“We’ve had leaks all through the building for the last several years,” Mathes said. “Hopefully this will remedy that and secure the stability of this building for quite some time.”

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